Book Review: Eschatological Discipleship

edEschatological Discipleship: Leading Christians to Understand Their Historical and Cultural Context by Trevin Wax is an academic read whose main thesis is based on “What time is it?” in human history. The book walks the reader through insights from the Old Testament, Matthew, Luke, Acts, church history, and our present age.

The book does a great job of driving home the point that eschatological discipleship is a key feature throughout the entire Bible and a key point in Christian discipleship. On the other side, the book is so academic in its study of eschatology and discipleship that it does not provide much practical help in assisting Christians in carrying out eschatological discipleship in the here and now.

Disclosure: I received this book free from B& H Publishing Group through the B&H/Lifeway Bloggers program. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

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Book Review: Searching for Spring

springSearching for Spring: How God Makes All Things Beautiful in Time by Christine Hoover artistically walks the reader through the nature of pain and suffering using the analogy of the nature’s seasons. The poetic prose captures the beauty and mystery of the struggle of walking through the unknown paths of life’s agonies. The author does a good job of not offering simplistic answers to the problems of pain while also pointing the reader to the hope of the gospel in Jesus Christ both in the present and in the future.

Disclosure: I received this book free from Baker Books through the Baker Books Bloggers program. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Book Review: Reading the Bible with Rabbi Jesus

reading rabbiReading the Bible with Rabbi Jesus: How a Jewish Perspective Can Transform Your Understanding by Lois Tverberg takes its readers through some key words and concepts of the Bible through a Jewish lens in an attempt to unlock a new appreciation of the Scriptures. One of the beauties of the book is that the author’s “new perspective” isn’t some disguised attempts to rewrite or redefine key orthodox truths. Rather, the chapters show nuanced facets that can bring a fresh appreciation of key biblical truths.

The one caveat to the great work done by the author is when she goes a bridge too far in the exhortation to look at biblical context when interpreting passages. After many great examples illustrating genres of literature and context clues for proper interpretation (such as the plucking out of an eye if it causes you to sin) she switches to eisegesis regarding the continuing of Jewish temple practices for those of Hebrew descent and cherry-picks some texts to try to back up her beliefs while promptly ignoring how the epistles of Galatians and Hebrews and other texts of Scripture dismantle her eisegesis stance.

Disclosure: I received this book free from Baker Books through the Baker Books Bloggers program. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Book Review: Baker Compact Dictionary

baker

The Baker Compact Dictionary of Biblical Studies by Tremper Longman III & Mark L. Strauss is a good reference tool for those who don’t want to lug around a huge book with multi-page definitions of terms. The compact tool gives insights not only into biblical terms but also into names and terms that one may come across in journals and contemporary commentaries. The compact dictionary is well worth keeping on your shelf or taking with you to wherever you happen to be studying.

Disclosure: I received this book free from Baker Books through the Baker Books Bloggers program. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Book Review: When We Say Father

fatherWhen We Say Father: Unlocking the Power of the Lord’s Prayer by Adrian and Steve Rogers takes the reader step-by-step through the Lord’s Prayer. Rather than simply giving one or two aspects of each line of the famous prayer pattern laid out by Jesus, the book opens multiple facets of consideration when slowly engaging the Lord while praying the Scripture.

One great benefit of the book is that each section points the reader back to Jesus. Jesus taught the prayer, Jesus is the one who empowers the elements of the prayer, Jesus gets the glory through us as the impact of the prayer takes root in our lives.

Disclosure: I received this book free from B& H Publishing Group through the B&H/Lifeway Bloggers program. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Book Review: The Cross and Christian Ministry

cross ministryThe Cross and Christian Ministry: Leadership Lessons from 1 Corinthians by D.A. Carson is a fine attempt to take Paul’s first epistle to the Corinthians and draw forth leadership principles when dealing with a church full of issues. Highlighting how Paul consistently pointed the Corinthians to Christ and His cross as the solution to the problems in the church was an excellent choice by Carson.

The downside to the overall excellent book is that the author tended to over-reach in some of his attempts to emphasize leadership principles. For example, the exegesis is overly strained when saying that the passage regarding being careful with what materials one is building upon the foundation of Christ (1 Cor. 3) was being spoken to the church leaders and not to the church at large – especially since the calling out of the elders of the church is absent in that chapter.

Disclosure: I received this book free from Baker Books through the Baker Books Bloggers program. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.